Girls in Zanzibar with Project Connect books (Picture: Salum Abdalla)

Girls in Zanzibar with Project Connect books (Picture: Salum Abdalla)

Project Connect Books for Africa

If education is the road out of poverty, books are the wheels needed for the journey.

Most children in the developing world have a restricted access to literacy.  Few have regular experience of reading for pleasure.  UKLA is determined to play a part in changing this. 

The underlying aim of Project Connect is to help spread an engaged, committed and critical literacy in the developing world.  With this in mind, Project Connect works to:

  • improve access to books in the language of primary literacy instruction
  • fund the purchase of locally written texts that are culturally appropriate
  • help teachers develop productive ways of working with books

UKLA raises funds for Project Connect through sales of donated second-hand books, raffles, school challenges, card sales and donations from individuals and enterprises.  The money raised is used to buy books directly in African countries and sometimes to pay for local CPD.  Our administrative costs are limited to money transfer and book collection from Dar-es-Salaam.

We have been doing this vital work since 2006 and as our income has increased, we have been able to significantly increase the number of schools we are able to support.

Currently UKLA is:

  • funding libraries in 14 primary schools in Zanzibar
  • funding book boxes for schools in Malawi
  • funding libraries in Ethiopia

 

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Reasons to join UKLA

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  • Get involved and make a difference
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